A Colonial Outline By A Filipino Hitler

The New Society:
A Colonial Outline By A Filipino Hitler.

Kindly make your own corrections as I am now writing only from a failing memory, but even if these events happened some 47 years ago, March 18, 1968 stands out very clearly when a brazen massacre was carried out in Corregidor, Bataan.

But first, let us look at the scenario more than fifty years ago:

During the incumbency of Presidents Carlos Garcia and Diosdado Macapagal in the 1950s and early 1960s, the Philippine economy was a shining star. Local and foreign businesses were booming, jobs were so plentiful in thousands of factories that produced myriads of goods not only for local consumption but more for the export market. Many industrial estates had to be created to accommodate numerous investments in manufacturing.

The Philippine peso was 1=1 with the US dollar.

Our military then had the state-of-the-art armaments — fighter jets, bombers, tanks, etc and our well-equipped navy ships patrolled the whole country including the Spratly Island group – known then as the Paracels.

Manila, like what New York is today, was the financial center and the fashion capital not only of the region but of Asia. The first airline in the whole of Asia was the Philippine Airlines. Manila was THE destination for foreigners who were arriving in droves, not of cheap tourists, but more of the world’s jet-set and of big business investors.

We were more than sufficient culturally, socially, economically, politically, and militarily.
Yes, we were the envy of all our Asian neighbors.

What were the tools available to an incoming leader?

When Ferdinand Marcos came to power, the National Media Production Center (NMPC) churned-out volumes and volumes of government propaganda and the Marcos government faired quiet well in that regard. However, the bigger audience was Asia and the world, and because Marcos wanted more fame, he created the Philippine Center for Asian Studies (PCAS) designed primarily to do interdisciplinary studies in the whole of Asia, but Ferdie still had more up his sleeve.

PCAS had an imposing building right next to the UP Law Center in the University of the Philippines campus in Diliman, but unlike the respectable institution that it is now, it was said to have been surreptitiously established as a think tank not only to solidify Philippine leadership in Asia, but to ensure Philippine dominance as well.

Operating with PCAS was a political essayist rumored in leftist circles as a CIA operative, Adrian Cristobal’s writing style was not only good but very impressive, but for many critics, the content of his essays were simply controversial. With him was intelligence officer General Jose Almonte, and yes, in this group then was this young typist who is now the newspaper columnist Conrado De Quiroz.

From them came out programs espousing a proud and prosperous Filipino nation with Malakas and Maganda leading the country. There was also this bold move to promote the changing the country’s name Philippines to Maharlika, as it was alleged that King Philip II of Spain, in whose honor this country was named after, was a big error because he was a weak and a syphilitic leader.

PCAS appeared to have been attempting to rewrite the “better” Philippine history. The New Society gave the nation a proud identity. And the Filipinos rallied behind their apparently strong President. Thanks to all the government-controlled television and radio stations, and all print media, the Nation truly looked Great Again.

What extenuating circumstances allowed Marcos to plan ahead?

With the whole Philippine economy already under his grip, specially because he practically controlled most of the vital industries, rumors were persistent that Marcos wanted to “remake” history with programs that looked similar to the “Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere” designed by Japan to conquer and rule Asia in the 1940s before they went to war.

Like the Japanese, the perverted dream of greatness in conquest may have crept into Marcos who wanted to invade other countries and risk war with our neighboring brothers.

Kindly read this brief:
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greater_East_Asia_Co-Prosperity_Sphere

Then, in a privilege speech at the Philippine Senate labeled the JABIDAH MASSACRE, Senator Ninoy Aquino lit a bomb when he exposed the sinister attempt of Marcos to invade Sabah using military force with 180 Muslims trained as military commandos. This adventurous plan was thereafter aborted when the covert ops was botched and as a cover-up, the Muslims trainees were massacred.

Read this exposé of San Ninoy Aquino in its entirety:
http://www.gov.ph/1968/03/28/jabidah-special-forces-of-evil-by-senator-benigno-s-aquino-jr/

This planned invasion, along with the earlier “Operation Merdeka”, is the linchpin of the megalomaniac ambition of Ferdinand Marcos to expand the Philippine territory by attacking Sabah and then to conquer other parts of the big island. These covert operations were designed to realize the Maharlika program of Marcos, but the massacre sparked the ire of our neighboring countries and our Muslim brothers who thereafter created the Moro National Liberation Front (MNLF) and later the MILF.

Read Wikipedia info on Jabidah Massacre and on Operation Merdeka:
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jabidah_massacre

Here are additional accounts on the earlier Philippine covert operations inside Sabah before the Jabidah Massacre.

Read Rappler article on Operation Merdeka in Sabah:
http://www.rappler.com/newsbreak/24025-jabidah-massacre-merdeka-sabah

This story of an ambitious Filipino Hitler may sound so incredible now and may look like a the theme of a James Bond movie but all these details are now written in our history, not by Ian Fleming, but by scores of our own Filipino writers.

MORE THAN THE VALUE OF THE STORY ON THIS MASSACRE, MARCOS WANTED TO RISK LOSING THE PEACE THAT WE ENJOYED AND BRING THE PHILIPPINES TO WAR WITH OUR NEIGHBORS TO FURTHER HIS MEGALOMANIAC AMBITIONS.

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